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John Sawin, Roxbury, Massachusetts, Banjo wall clock / Circa 1830 - $1,350 (Easton, Maryland)

John Sawin, Roxbury, Massachusetts, Banjo wall clock / Circa 1830 1 thumbnailJohn Sawin, Roxbury, Massachusetts, Banjo wall clock / Circa 1830 2 thumbnailJohn Sawin, Roxbury, Massachusetts, Banjo wall clock / Circa 1830 3 thumbnailJohn Sawin, Roxbury, Massachusetts, Banjo wall clock / Circa 1830 4 thumbnailJohn Sawin, Roxbury, Massachusetts, Banjo wall clock / Circa 1830 5 thumbnailJohn Sawin, Roxbury, Massachusetts, Banjo wall clock / Circa 1830 6 thumbnailJohn Sawin, Roxbury, Massachusetts, Banjo wall clock / Circa 1830 7 thumbnailJohn Sawin, Roxbury, Massachusetts, Banjo wall clock / Circa 1830 8 thumbnailJohn Sawin, Roxbury, Massachusetts, Banjo wall clock / Circa 1830 9 thumbnailJohn Sawin, Roxbury, Massachusetts, Banjo wall clock / Circa 1830 10 thumbnailJohn Sawin, Roxbury, Massachusetts, Banjo wall clock / Circa 1830 11 thumbnailJohn Sawin, Roxbury, Massachusetts, Banjo wall clock / Circa 1830 12 thumbnail
Hanson
condition: excellent
John Sawin, Roxbury, Massachusetts, Banjo wall clock / Circa 1830


H 32” / D 3” / Base W 10” / Dial door DIA 8.75”
Painted tin dial signed: John Sawin, BOSTON
Roman numerals
Moon hands
8-day brass movement
The teeth in the gear train are deeply cut
Pendulum features a brass face bob
Case wood constructed in mahogany
Turned wooden finial surmounts the case
Operates as intended
Movement serviced and weight cable replaced

History:

John Sawin was born in Roxbury, Massachusetts on September 13th, 1799. His parents were John Pierce Sawin and Abigail Partridge (1781-Unknown.) It is thought that he was trained as a clockmaker by his uncle Aaron Willard. John was also related to Lemuel Curtis who was a cousin. Throughout his career, John had a number of working relationships. It appears the he worked with Simon Willard in 1819-1820. He is then soon listed as a journeyman working with Aaron Willard Jr. By 1822, John had formed a partnership with George Wild Dyar as Sawin & Dyar. This shop was located at 33 Market Street. This partnership lasted until 1827. John continued to make clocks on his own and continued to employe many apprentices and journeyman. The Massachusetts Charitable Mechanic Association held it first fair in 1837. John Sawin entered two gallery clocks in the competition. They were equipped with improved regulators to avoid the necessity of removing the dial. They were proclaimed to be the best clocks exhibited at the fair and he was awarded a Diploma by this new organization. John Died on March 28, 1863 at the age of 62. He is buried in the Christ Church Cemetery on Salem Street in Boston, MA.

The number of signed Sawin clocks that survive in today’s marketplace suggests that he was very successful. He advertised that he made Tower clocks and wall regulators. Wall timepieces, gallery clocks and Massachusetts Shelf clocks have been found. John Sawin is probably best known for creating the lyre form wall timepiece.


Buyer covers packaging and shipping unless picked up.
Additional photos available upon request.
Payment options: Zelle, PayPal, Cash, Bank check


Tom
Easton, MD, 21601
show contact info (call for details)
Pick up or buyer covers shipping / packaging.
$1,350.00

post id: 7743900560

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